Dua Lipa – Future Nostalgia (Review)

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Future Nostalgia

A fabulous upbeat bop that sets the tone for the whole album and serves an instant mood, bound to get you up on your feet and spinning around the room. Loving the lyric “you want the recipe, but can’t handle my sound” – Dua is fully feeling herself.

Don’t Start Now

Safe to say that we’ve already been loving this one, an instant club classic and feel good anthem. What isn’t there to love about a self-confident, empowerment anthem though? Shake off that ex, put on your dancing shoes and head straight to the dance-floor with the besties!

Cool

Now this gives us debut album vibes with a transition into the new era, a more chilled vibe than the first two tracks, great for an easy listen but still pleasantly upbeat. Think Sunday afternoons in the sun with a casual drink in hand and a smile on your face.

Physical

Honestly, we still can’t get enough of this one. Someone this manages to be our living room work-out, shower, driving and club anthem and we aren’t even mad about it. It sound’s like Dua took a little bit of the 80s, 90s and 2000s, remixed them and produced an absolute banger.

Levitating

Think a little bit Katy Perry in the Teenage Dream era but with more attitude and a somewhat 90’s vibe that will leave you clapping along with the catchy hooks and swaying your body in no time. This has night in with the girls written all over it – full PJ party mood.

Pretty Please

So mid album we have a somewhat slower number, but not so slow that you won’t still be able to get your dance one. It’s like a singalong break amidst an album full of booty-shakers and hip swayers. There’s a lot of sexual undertones (as if Dua is that subtle) with this one so be prepared.

Hallucinate

And just like that, we’re back up on our feet and making our bodies move. If this wasn’t absolutely created for the dance floor, we don’t know what is. The chorus is super catchy, caused involuntary head bopping and if it doesn’t end up being a single we may have to riot. “Got stars in my eyes and they don’t fade when you come my way” is a mood we’re fully on board.

Love Again

Somewhere between club banger and bedroom bop (with a hairbrush of course), a little nod to finding unexpected new love after a break-up that had you shook. We can see this becoming a big mood for a lot of people and could quite easily be another single in the future. We’d love to see a video of Dua with a new man as she strolls past her exes looking totally unimpressed at them.

Break My Heart

Remember that love at first sight vibe, but you’re almost certain you’re get your hear broken? Here’s a stunning dance track that will have you turning that potential heart break into a fully choreographed routine with back up dancers and matching outfits. So happy to see a stunning video for this one already and not at all shocked it was a single.

Good In Bed

Initially we were expecting that Dua may be bragging about her skills in the bedroom, and we wouldn’t even have been mad. Instead what we have is a super catchy bop sending a love note to those relationships where you have a habit of arguing but following it up with mind-blowing sex. We’re sure this will be an incredibly relevant set of lyrics for many. A highlight would be “Yeah, we don’t know how to talk, but damn we know how to f*ck”.

Boys Will Be Boys

To finish off the album, Dua is basically done with current toxic masculinity vibe and men who remain immature their whole life, the kind we should all avoid. This is a female power anthem, slower than most of the album, but with an important PSA of “if you’re offended by this song, you’re clearly doing something wrong”. Honestly, this feels like a really important song right now and we couldn’t love her more for putting it out there.

Overall rating – An easy 9/10, one or two slow burners but not a single bad track on the album

Instant fave – A toss up between Physical and Hallucinate

Congrats Dua, you’ve got us fully hooked!

What are you waiting for? Go stream/buy Future Nostalgia right now.

Photo Credit: Hugo Comte